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Articles in the Observed Category

Disfluent by Design, Featured, Observed, The Printed Word »

[23 Dec 2010 | Comments Off | ]
Paper Artist

Woah, these are seriously awesome.
Jeff Nishinaka is a Los Angeles native paper sculptor who cuts, folds and shapes paper in the least intrusive way to maintain the feel and integrity of paper in creating beautiful three-dimensional paper sculptures. He does illustration work, fine art pieces and even some large-scale installation.
Above is just one of the samples of his work. For more photos and his entire portfolio, visit ww.jeffnishinaka.com.

Disfluent by Design, Observed, Online Design, Social Media, The Printed Word »

[16 Dec 2010 | Comments Off | ]
Mediocrity Campaign

Subaru has a cool advertising campaign called Mediocrity. They’ve created a fake car called the 2011 Mediocrity, complete with faux ad campaign and complete website. The video above is the Apple-esque designer interviews, on how they were able to make the car so incredibly mundane. The spoof is honestly what it seems some designers/companies think. The hard-working folks who brought 2011 Mediocrity to life talk about their inspirations for designing it. Darren Tibbits, Charles S. Veit and Marilyn Reiter reveal the level of thinking that went into every detail of …

Disfluent by Design, Observed »

[16 Dec 2010 | Comments Off | ]
A Very Studley Chest Indeed

I don’t know what posessed Henry O. Studley to build  this case to hold 300 mostly piano-making tools but I have to hand it to the man for his ingenuity and craftsmanship. Had he lived 150 years later, he’d be designing circuit boards. As it stands, Studley was born in 1838 and worked as a piano maker, carpenter and mason. Sometime in the 1890s he designed this amazing tool cabinet, which has become known in woodworking circles as the Henry O. Studley tool chest. Who knows how …

Disfluent by Design, Observed, Online Design »

[15 Dec 2010 | Comments Off | ]
Interactive Census Map

Everyone knows that the census takes in an extraordinary amount of information about the U.S. population but, once collected, how do you display it usefully? The New York Times created a series of interactive maps showing ethnic breakdowns, density, education, income, and various breakdowns within those categories. The information can be viewed on a census tract basis which allows for very detailed analysis or can be viewed zoomed out to see regional overviews. The amount of information shown is impressive as is the clarity of the data. Visit the New …

Observed, The Printed Word »

[15 Dec 2010 | Comments Off | ]
Views of 2011 from 1931

1931 was a long time ago, and few who live today can claim to remember it all too well. Just two years after the stock market crash of 1929, 1931 claimed Herbert Hoover as the President of the United States (which that year had 48 states). Movie monsters were the rage; Bela Lugosi starred in Tod Browning’s Dracula film and Boris Karloff did his star turn in Frankenstein. Cab Calloway recorded the classic “Minnie The Moocher” (and he was 49 years from performing it again in 1980′s The Blues Brothers). …

Disfluent by Design, Featured, Observed »

[9 Dec 2010 | Comments Off | ]
Magic Carp-Pet

Australia-based designer John Leung has collaborated with Melbourne’s Clarke Hopkins Clarke Architects to create the Magic Carp-Pet rug and coffee table set. Look through the slatted coffee table to reveal the rug below as a series of fish that appear to wriggle. Check out the video below to see it in action. I can only hope, though, that we’re not going to see galloping horses next.

Disfluent by Design, Featured, Observed, The Printed Word »

[19 Nov 2010 | Comments Off | ]
Linotype: The Movie

With the success of Helvetica: The Movie, and the forthcoming Herbert Matter movie, it would seem natural that someone would create a film about the rise and fall of Linotype. For those who don’t know, Linotype revolutionized the typesetting industry in the 19th century allowing vast amounts of text to be set quickly by a single operator by pushing buttons on a…wait for it…keyboard. Prior to this, printing type was “composed” by picking up individual characters and setting them, one by one, into a letterpress printing press.
By contrast, the Linotype …

Observed, Online Design, Social Media »

[15 Nov 2010 | Comments Off | ]
Facebook Messaging: One Inbox to Rule them all

The blogosphere is buzzing about Facebook’s proposed messaging system. But is it DOA or the future of online communications?
History is littered with solutions to problems we never knew we had. Betamax was a better alternative to VHS tapes, Sony Mini Disc was more portable than CDs, HD DVD was cheaper to implement than Blue-ray DVD. But just because something solves a need doesn’t insure success. Does the world need Facebook mail? No. Will it succeed? Maybe. I think that Facebook, in opening up the ability for users to have an …

Featured, Headline, Observed, Online Design, Social Media, The Printed Word »

[8 Nov 2010 | Comments Off | ]
Disfluency: The Art of Making Things Difficult

Speech disfluencies are any of various breaks, irregularities, or utterances that are often not consistent with any specific grammatical construction and occur within the flow of otherwise fluent speech. These include, for example, words and sentences that are cut off mid-utterance, phrases that are restarted or repeated, repeated syllables, grunts or unrecognizable utterances occurring as “fillers”, and “repaired” utterances.
In short, disfluency is a break in an otherwise consistent grammatical flow and, as such, is not desirable.
But how about visual disfluency?
Visual disfluency is a break …